Hoare, Hoar

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Hoar

Richard Hoare c1508 -
Thomas Hoare 1534 - 1590
Charles Hoare 1568 - 1636
Charles Hoar 1586 - 1638
John Hoar 1622 - 1704
Daniel Hoar 1650 -
Leonard Hoar 1682 - 1771
David Hoar 1713 - 1783
Solomon Hoar 1748 - 1828
David Hoar 1783 - 1861
Agnes Hoar 1812 - 1896 Married Robert John Nelson, 9 Jan 1831

Hoars in the Family

"So you have hoars in your family?"

"Yes and proud of them!"

The typical comment made by friends when they are introduced to some of my distant relatives and my response. In his excellent book by William S. Hoar, By Way of New England[1], Hoar and Newcomb pioneers in America gives some insight in to the derivation of the Family name Hoar.

The dictionary meaning of "hoar" (from English) is "old" and used as "hoary" it means grey or white with age and venerable - thus "hoar-frost" and "hoar-stones", the ancient stones marking boundaries.

As a family name, ours is a very ancient one in England, Wales and Ireland. "Hoar" or some variant of it has been used as a surname since medieval times. Hore, Hora, Hor, Hoore, Hooare, Horey, Horrie, Horam, Horem, Hoar, Hoare, Whoare. The earliest spelling of the name seems to have been Hore, often preceded by le

William Hoar indicates the name was included in the Doomsday Book, a census ordered by William the Conqueror. Another early reference was of William le Hore, a Norman Knight who invaded Ireland in 1170. His family was setup at Wexford. He also records that the name of "Hoare" was among Cromwell's fighters in 1649 and received lands and castles in Cork, Kerry and Kilkerry .

The most ancient records in England come from Devonshire and Gloucestershire from whence our earliest known ancestors came. The earliest found to date is Richard Hoar of which little is known.

Coat of Arms

arms

Divided quarterly; black and red, placed over all a silver eagle with two heads, wings spread, a border invoked colored counterchanged. Above the shield and helmet is a silver eagle's head jagged, charged with three ermine spots; hanging from his beak a ring.

Richard Hoare, 1503

Much of the information that I have collected on early Hoares comes from Henry S Nourse (1899) The Ancestry of the Hoar Family in America, A Compilation from Collections made by the Honorable George Frisbie Hoar. reprinted in New England Historical and Genealogy Register 53 92-101, 186-198, 289-300[2]

The earliest Hoar that I believe I can with reasonably certainty claim as my direct ancestor is Richard Hoare, born about 1508. He married Ellen Unknown about 1512.

Additional information from Nourse:

1544. The will of Richard Hoore of Leckhampton, husbandman, proved Oct. 23, 1545, bequeaths to wife Ellen his crops, debts, etc., leaving her to give what she pleases to the children.

Thomas Hoare, 1534 - 1590

Thomas Hoare, son of Richard and Ellen (?) Hoare, was born in Lockhampton, Gloucester c. 1534. He married Margaret Unknown who was born about 1537 in Gloucester, England. He died about 1590. They had four children

Margery Hoare
John Hoare
Giles Hoare b. 1566 Gloucester
Charles Hoare (See below)

Charles Hoare, Senior, 1568 - 1636

Charles Hoare, son of Thomas and Ellen Hoare was born about 1586 in Gloucester, England.

According to the terms of the will Charles was a saddler by trade. Earliest records record the hire of a horse to on Robert Lowe around 1588 at the time of the Spanish Armada record:

"To Charles Hoare for hyer of a horse for two dayes weh Roger Lowe had to Cisseter (Cirencester) when he went to bringe the souldiers towards portingate."

He appears to be a man of substantial wealth. In 1608 at the age of about forty, he is reported to be somewhat short of stature, suitable for service with a caliver, and already trained as a soldier.

Margery Hoare

A note of William S. Hoar's Book "By Way of New England nicely summarizes the early history and relating it to the name of Charles's Wife who he married in 1585:

We do not know her maiden name. Hoare (1883) states that Charles married Anne Clifford of Frampton-on-Severn, near Gloucester. Anne was an heiress of the same family as Lord de Clifford. The evidence seems to be based on the coat of arms, quartering those of Clifford in a stained glass window in the church of Frampton-on-Severn where Anne and her husband are buried. Indeed, early records show that there were connections between the Hoare and Clifford families but fail to link Anne Clifford with our family. The given name Anne is not found among early members of our family while Margery occurs several times. We conclude that the surname of the elder Charles Hoare's wife is unknown and unlikely to be discovered.[3]

According to William Hoare authorities the Gloucester Hoares of England came from Devonshire area of England.

Will of Charles Hoare the Elder, of Gloucester, 1632.

In the name of God, Amen, the Nyne and Twentith day of May Anno domini 1632,

I, Charles Hoare th'elder, of the Citty of Glouc[este]r, sadler, beinge weake and sicklie in body, but of good and p[er]fect memorie (thanks be geven to God for the same) doe make and ordeyne this my last will and testament in manner and forme followinge.

First and principallie I give and bequeath my soule unto almightie God my Creator and maker, and unto Jesus christ his only sonne and my alone saviour and redeemer, hopinge and trustinge through his meritts and bitter passion (in full assurance) to enioy and inherit the kingdome of heaven, there to raigne with him everlastingly

And as for my bodye (beinge but dust and ashes) I bequeath to the earth from whence it came, to be buried at the discretion of my executor of this my will, hoping for A ioyfull resurrection both of my sowle and body at the last and generall day.

And as concerning my worldly goods and substance wherewith God hath bestowed uppon me and blessed me w[i]th, I give and dispose in manner and form followinge.

First I give and bequeath unto my beloved wife Margery the use and quiet possession of the howse and ymplements wherein I now dwell,

To have and to hold to her, for her my said wife and my sonne Thomas Hoare, therein to dwell, use and occupy during her naturall life, they payinge the rent due to the Citty of Glouc[ester], and keeping the said howse in all needfull and necessary rep[ar]ac[i]ons, as by the lease thereof I am enioyned,

And after her deceasse, my will is that my sonne Charles Hoare shall have all my right and interest unto the said howse and lease thereof gra[u]nted unto me from the said citty, and that he shall renew the said lease in his owne name,

And alsoe my will is that the plumpe, the noast, the testernes, the glass windowes, wainscot and benches, with the tables board in the hawle and the levery cupboard and other cupboards lastinge to the howse, to remayne to him, the said Charles, his heires and assignes, w[i]th the said howse at the deceasse of my said wife,

Provided that my sonne Charles or his assignes doe pay or cause to be paid unto my sonne Thomas Hoare or his assignes the somme of tenne pounds of lawfull English Mony w[i]thin the space of fowreteene dayes after he is possessed of the howse and ymplements,

And if he, the said Charles, or his assignes, shall refuse to pay the same as aforesayd, being lawfull demanded,

Then my will is that my sonne Thomas shall have the said howse, ymplements and lease.

Item I give to my said sonne Thomas fyve silver spones and one silver bowle.

Item I give unto my sonne Charles my silver salt and fyve silver spones,

W[hi]ch said plate soe to my said twoe sonnes geven, my will is the same shalbe in the use and possession of my said wife during her life, and after her deceasse to remayne unto them.

Item I give to Thomas Hore, Margery Hore and John Hore, children of my sonne Charles Hoare, Fyve poundes betwene them three.

Item I give and bequeath unto my said sonne Thomas the lease of my stable and garden in Travell Lane w[hi]ch I hold of the Dean and Chapter,

To have and to hold unto him for and duringe the residue of such terme in the same lease as shalbe to come at my decease.

Item I give unto Charles Hoare and Johan Hoare, the children of my sonne Thomas Hoare, the some of fyve pounds betweene them.

Item I give unto Charles Tarne A saddle, furnished.

Item I doe hereby appointe my lovinge sonne Charles Hoare to be my Executor of this my last will and Testam[en]t, in trust, and not to make any benifit of the executorshipp to his owne use, and for the better providinge and mainetenance of my saide wife during her natural life.

My will is and I doe appointe (that my debtes if any be and funerall charges being paid and discharged by my Executor out of my estate yet unbequeathed) that all the rest of my goodes, Chattelles, Cattle, houshold stuffe and ymplem[en]tes of houshold whatsoev[er] yet unbequeathed shalbe ymploied by the appointm[en]t of my Executor to the use, benifitt and behoofe of my wife and my sonne Thomas Hoare, his heires and Assignes, and the benifitt thereof to be yerely equally devided betweene them, and soe to remaine at the disposinge of my Executor, w[i]th th'advise of my Overseers, during the life of my said wife

And after her deceasse, my will is that the sayd estate of my goodes and Chattells shalbe by my saide Executor conferred uppon my sonne Thomas Hoare, his heires and Assignes (the funerall charge of my wife being discharged first out of it) w[i]thin one moneth after her deceasse,

And that my will may be the better p[er]formed, my will and desire is that my said Executor shall w[i]thin sixe weekes after my deceasse enter into one bond of Twoe hundred poundes to the Overseers of this my will, that this my will shalbe p[er]formed by him in all pointes,

And if he refuse to enter into such bond, then my will is and I doe appointe my sayd sonne Thomas Hoare to be Executor of this my will

And I doe desire my sonnes in law Mr Thomas Hill and Mr Leon[ar]d Tarne to be Overseers of this my will, and I give to each of them for their pains to see my will p[er]formed A saddle A peece, furnished fitt for their use.

And in witnes hereof I have hereunto putt my hand and Seale in the p[re]sence of thes being witnesses

The m[ar]ke of Charles Hoare

The m[ar]ke of James Tiler and
John Hollandes

Children of Charles and Margery Hoare

Their children
Thomas Hoare b. 1585. Thomas had two sons Charles and John.
Charles Hoare b. 1586 (See below)
Margery Hoare b. c1590 m. Thomas Hill
Elinor Hoare b. c. 1592
Anna Hoare b. c. 1594 m. Leonard Tarne

Nourse indicates that two daughters married Thomas Hill and Leonard Tarne and Ancestral files have been used to assign but there is little background evidence to substantiate claims.

One of his daughters married Thomas Hill an alderman in 1630 and the major of Gloucester. in 1640 and another married Leonard Tarne, a glover by trade and considerable wealth and Sheriff of county and city of Gloucester in 1630. Charles Hoare the Senior died about 1636

Of the four children of Charles Hoare senior, named in this will, Thomas had two sons, Charles and John, also mentioned but of father or sons nothing further of interest is known with certainty. The names appear in Gloucestershire annals from time to time, but the identification of personalities is not easy. Of the two daughters, wives of Thomas Hill and Leonard Tarne, the baptismal names are irrevocably lost. Hill was an alderman and Tarne sheriff of the county and city of Gloucester in 1630. Thomas Hill became mayor of the city in 1640. By grant of Edward Third this city is a county by itself. A mayor and two sheriffs were annually chosen by the twelve Aldermen and twelve other of the most legal and discreet Burgesses. (Fosbrooke's Gloucester, p.414.) The office of the sheriff seems to have been in social dignity on a par, at least, with that of mayor. Thomas Hill died, according to Rudder, p.402, in October 1652, and was buried in the church of St. Mary de Crypt. His son Robert was a goldsmith, then equivalent to banker, in Gloucester. In the will of Leonard Tarne, dated Nov. 3, 1641, with a codicil bearing date April 9, 1642, mention is made of his brothers Thomas, John and Gervase, and sister Elizabeth Cathorne, all with small families; also of his son Thomas with daughters Elizabeth and Damaris. But by baptismal records we know that five sons were born to him:- Myles, baptized 1595; Charles, 1601; John, 1604; Thomas, 1609; George, 1613. The high standing and wealth of Leonard Tarne are attested by the great length of his will and by the large amount of property bequeathed. Among his possessions was the noted Raven Tavern still standing, which he devised to trustees, one of whom one was Thomas Hoare, doubtless his nephew, the oldest son of Charles. His most noteworthy bequest was a public one: unto the Mayor and Burgesses of the Cittie of Glouc'r.: and to their successors forever one yearly rent or sume of foure pounds of lawfull money of England to be issuinge and going out of all that pasture ground with the appurtences called or commonly known by the name of Monckleighton . . . the said yearly rent or sume to be paid at the ffeast of St. Thomas the apostle and upon the ffridaie next before Easter day usually called good ffridaie . . . to be given unto fortie poore people of this cittie most needinge the same, to each of them Twelve pence a peece. Monkleighton is now a suburb covered with fine residences and known as Alexandria Road in Gloucester. Leonard Tarne was a glover with an extensive business, and there is a tradition in Gloucester that this was transferred to Worcester and finally came into the hands of the Dents.

Charles Hoare, 1586 - 1638, WIFE, JOANNA HINCKSMAN

Charles Hoar, son of Charles and Magery Hoare was born on 21 Dec. 1586 in Gloucester, England.. [8] He married Joanna Hincksman (also spelled Hinksman, Hinxman, Henchman) about July 9 1609. Charles commenced in his father's business of making saddles but switched to the brewing business. He became quite wealthy. He was active in civic affairs. He was an alderman from 1632 until his death in1638. He was sheriff in 1634. He was involved in resistance to King Charles. He was prosecuted by Archbishop Laud for granting monies to one John Workman who was being prosecuted for his Puritan views.

Charles Hoare son of Charles Hoare of the City of Gloucester, saddler, by act of Indenture made on the day of the Feast of St. Thomas the Apostle [Dec. 21] in the year of the reign of Queen Elizabeth the forty-first, binds himself apprentice to the said Charles & Margerie, his wife, in the trade in which the said Charles now practices, for the term of eight years following the feast aforesaid by act agreed upon verbally on each part. And the said Charles & Margerie will pay the said apprentice at the end of the time 40 shillings.(Nourse 1899)[9]

Charles Hoare junior, the executor of his father's will, was probably the eldest son. He became a man of substance and one greatly respected in his native city, as is attested by the fact that he was one of its aldermen from 1632 to 1638. His name is found in the Council minutes with "gentleman" or "generous" affixed to it. In the lists of members of the Council for the six years before his decease his name always appears, although generally among "nomina eorum qui fecerunt defaultum," that is, were absent from the meetings. He followed the occupation of brewer, although he had served a long apprenticeship with his father, the saddler, and his will indicates that he carried on the business of wool stapling, a trade which early attained great importance in Gloucestershire, and has been pursued by members of the Hoare family there, especially at Cirencester, down to quite recent days.

The date of Charles Hoare's marriage to Joanna Hinksman is tentatively given as July 9 1609 . According to William Hoare in By way of New England there may have been eight children. Of their children three only are named in his father's will - Thomas, Margery and John; the other three mentioned in his own will - Daniel, Leonard and Joanna - being minors in 1632. There may have been others deceased, and probably of these were Ruth, buried June 1628, and Charles graduate at Oxford 1630, aged 17. The Hincksman or Henchman was prosperous and highly esteemed in Gloucester. A Joseph Hinxman was graduated at Oxford in 1577, and became rector of the parish of Naunton, fourteen miles north-east of the city of Gloucester. Of her immediate family we know only that she had brothers William, Walter, Edward and Thomas, and sisters Elinor Bailes and _____ Founes. Thomas Hincksman, in 1634 called "late servant to Mr. Charles Hoare for the space of eight years now past," was then made a burgess, paying a fine of 10s. A Walter Hincksman about the same period was rector at Matlock in Derbyshire. The noted Captains Thomas and Daniel Henchman, who figured in the early Indian wars in New England, may have been kinsmen of Joanna, though proof of this is lacking. That there was some relationship between the early immigrants in New England bearing the names Hoare and Hinksman seems probable from the frequency with which these names are found associated. Capt. Daniel Henchman was one of the witnesses to Doctor Leonard Hoar's will, and Thomas appended his signature as witness to a power of attorney given by Daniel Hoare

Gloucester

Gloucester is the county town of Gloucestershire, located in South West England close to the Welsh border, and on the River Severn approximately 32 miles (51 km) north-east of Bristol and 45 miles (72 km) south-southwest of Birmingham. For an internet history of Glouc est or see A History of the County of Glouc est or

Puritans

Children of Charles and Joanna Hoar

Thomas Hoare b. 1612
Charles Hoare b. 1613
Magery Hoare b. 1614 m. John Matthews 25 Dec. 1633 Gloucester, subsequently m. Rev Henry Flint of Braintree d. March 1686-7
Ruth Hoare b. 1617
Daniel Hoare b.1621 Emigrated to New England in 1640 but believed to have returned to England
John Hoare b. 1622 (See below)
Joanna Hoare born abt. 1624 and whose descendant include wife of US President John Adams and whose son was President John Quincy Adams
Leonard Hoare b. 1630 returned to England for nine years where he married Bridget Lisle before returning to America. Leonard Hoare became President of Harvard University from 1672 to 1875

Joanna Hoar emigrated to New England in 1640[10]

The cause of her migration is thus stated in words attributed to her by the subject of this memoir in a letter announcing a gift to Ratcliffe College:- "I was a contemporary of the pious and bountiful Lady Radcliffe for whom your college is named. My honored husband, Charles Hoar, Sheriff of Gloucester in England, by his death in 1638, left me a widow of six children . We were of the people called by their revilers Puritans, to whom civil liberty, sound learning and religion were very dear. The times were troubious in England and the hands of princes and prelates were heavy upon God's people. My thoughts were turned to the new England where precious Mr. John Harvard had just lighted that little candle which has since thrown its beams so far, where there seemed a providential refuge for those who desired a church without a bishop, and a state without a king.
I did not, therefore, like the worshipful Lady Radcliffe, send my contribution in money, but I came hither myself, bringing the five youngest of my children with me, and arrived at Braintree in the year 1640"[11].

According to Charles H. Pope, Pioneers of Massachusetts, Thomas was the only child of Charles and Joanna who did not emigrate with their mother. The baptismal records of St. Mary de Crypt record states that Thomas was baptized 15 June 1612. According to William Hoar, in By Way of New England, Charles, born in 1613, died before the family emigrated and sometimes after 1630 when he graduated with a BA from Oxford.

MARGERY HOARE (daughter of Joanna and Charles Hoare) married John Matthews at St. Nicholas Church in Gloucester, December 25, 1633, and had a son Charles who is mentioned in his grandfather Hoare's will. She was a widow, and probably childless, when she came to New England. She married her second husband Rev. Henry Flynt of Braintree.

The ten children born to Henry and Margery Flynt as recorded in Braintree Records were:-

Dorothy, b. 21. 5 mo. 1642; married Samuel Shephard, 1666.
Annah, b. 11. 7 mo. 1643; married John Dassett, 1662.
Josiah, b. 24. 6 mo. 1645; married Esther Willet.
Margarett, b. 20. 4 mo. 1647; died 29, 6 mo. 1648.
Joanna, b. 18. 12 mo. 1648; married Noah Newman 1669.
David, b. 11. 11 mo. 1651; died 21. 1 mo. 1652.
Seth, b. 2. 2 mo. 1653.
Ruth, b. 31. 11 mo. 1654.
Cotton and John, b. 16. 7 mo. 1656; died 20. 9 mo. 1656.

The eldest son Josiah, graduated from Harvard College in 1664, and was ordained the successor of Rev. Richard Mather at Dorchester December 27, 1671. He died at the early age of thirty-five years, September 16, 1680. His wife was Esther, daughter of Captain Thomas Willett, first mayor of New York city. Of her four children one was the noted bachelor Tutor Flynt who served Harvard College for the unexampled term of fifty-five years - 1699 - 1754 - and died in 1760. Her daughter Dorothy married Edmond Quincy, May 11, 1678, and thus the Quincy family derives descent from Joanna Hincksman Hoare through both of her daughters, Joanna and Margery. Mrs. Dorothy Flynt Quincy died in 1737..

Will of Charles Hoare Jr. dated Sept. 25, 1638. at Gloucester, England. [12]

"Prerogative Court of Canterbury, Doctors Commons, granted Administration 31 December 1638, to Joane Hoare the relict.” :

In the name of God Almightie Creator of all thinges and in ;Jesus Christ his deare and only son my most bountifull loveing Saviour and in the blessed spiritt my comforter Amen. I Charles Hoare of the citie of Gloucester being weake in body but perfect in memory blessed by my good God therefore, Doe hereby declare that my last will and testament as followeth ffirst I bequeath my soule into the handes of God that created it and my deare Saviour that soe dearlie ransom'd it with full confidence thorough his merrittes that after the end of this life it shall rest wth him everlastingly. And my bodie to the earthe from whence it came wth full assurance that at the last daie when my Saviour shall appeare in glory it shalbe by his power raised up to the resurrection of the iust, And for the estate it hath pleased God to lend unto me of the thinges of this world I thus dispose ffirst that with as much convenient speede as may well be all my rentes and debtes sett downe under my hand and all other if any be and can appeare to be due shalbe paid. Item: I give to my brother Thomas Hoare twentie poundes, to my sister Elinor Bailies fortie shillinges, to my brother William Hincksman and Walter Hincksman and Edward Hincksman and my sister ffounes twentye shillinges a peece in gould, alsoe I give to my brother Thomas Hincksman five poundes and to my servant John Sponar at presberie five markes and to his wife five nobles and to Thomas Prichard my servant fortie shillinges and to Thomas Ade my servant tenn shillinges, Alsoe I give to Mr. Thomas Vell and to Alderman Hill and Mr. Leonard Tarne my brother lawes and my brother too new rings for my sake, and to good Mr. Workman our faithfull watchman forty shillings. Alsoe I give unto my welbeloved wife Joane Hoare ye some of three hundred and fiftie poundes and to my sonne John Hoare twoe hundred pounds and to my son Daniell Hoare one hundred and fiftie poundes and to my daughter Joane Hoare a hundred pounds and to my son Leonard Hoare one hundred pounds any my will is that my wife shall have the furniture of houshold that I have in all places at her disposing during her life and after to come indiferentlie amongst my children except the goodes at Thornebery wch was deliuered me by the sheriffe by verture of an elegit all wch I give unto my daughter Margerie Mathewe presentlie after my decease. Alsoe I give unto my sonn Thomas Hoare twentie poundes. Alsoe I give to the said Margery my daughter and her sonne Charles Mathewe twoe hundred poundes and my will is that soe longe as this twoe hundred poundes remaines in the stocke which I shall leave (which shalbe till my executors and overseers shall allowe thereof for her good to lett him have it,) there shalbe unto her and her sonne sixteene poundes a yeare quarterly paid and my will and desire is that the stocke I shall leave unto my wife and the foure first named children with the twoe hundred poundes given my daughter shalbe used and imployed uppon the three bargaines I have taken at Encombe, Presbery and Slimsbridg and my wife and the foure children to have their maintenance out of it, and my will is that my sonne Leonard shalbe carefullie kept at Schoole and when he is fitt for itt to be carefullie placed at Oxford, and if ye Lord shall see fitt, to make him a Minister unto his people and that all ye charge therof shalbe discharged out of the proffitt which it shall please God to send out of the stocke and that all the rest of my estate unbequeathed all debtes and expence being discharged shalbe equallie deuided betweene my wife and my twoe sonnes Daniell and John, and Joane, and the profittes of the said stocke to accrewe unto them alsoe untill my executors and my overseers shall agree for their good to lett any of them have their porcons for their p'ferment. Only this excepted that my sonne Leonard shall have accrue and dewe unto him out of this estate six poundes a yeare to bee paid unto him by the foresaid hundred poundes when my executors and overseers shall allowe of it to be for his preferment and if anie of my children shall die before they come to make use of their porcons my will is that porcons soe falling out salbe equallie devided amongst my five children nowe with me and my sonne Thomas aforsaid and if it sahll soe happen that the stocke bequeathed be not founde fitt to be imployed as I have directed but I trust ye Lord will soe blesse that happie trade of life unto them that some of them will never give over but if soe should be then my will is that my executors pay in ye porcons unto them if they bee att age or els to paie it in or good securitie to my overseers and my will is that as I have agreed with Mr. Thomas Vell and p'mised there shall alwaies be really upon the groundes att Encome with I have taken of him for Eight yeares eight hunred of the best ewes to stand for his securitie untill all rentes and dewes whatsoever shalbe really paid unto him, and now deare saviour spreade thy armes of mercie over me purge away my synnes though they are many and greate and my faith weake lett they power be seene in my weaknes and thay strength in my mainfould infirmities keepe me from that evill one and Receive me to they mercy to whom with God the father and the holie spiritt be all glorie and power and thankes giveinge both nowe and for evermore Amen the 25th day of September 1638. By me Cha: Hoare: ffurther I give unto my sonne John Hoare fortie poundes more wch shall accrewe unto him when all the other are satisfied out of the estate.

Admon granted 21 Dec. 1638 - to Joane Hoare the relict

John Hoar 1622 - 1704

John Hoare, son of Charles and Joanna Hoare was born c.1622. [18]

In England at the age of 11, 1633, he was bound as an apprentice to his father Charles Hoare of the City of Gloucester, brewer, and Johanna his wife by Indenture made on the day of the Feast of St. James the Apostle (May 11.) for a term of ten years. His father died 5 years later in 1638. He had a good education in England. He emigrated with his mother Joanna Hoar and her family in 1640 to New England and settled in Scituate, Massachusetts. The final "e” was dropped from the name about this time.

While in Scituate he drafted deeds bonds and was called a lawyer.

Nourse provides the following information with respect to John Hoar's relationship to the ecliastic authorites of the day: [19]

John appears in Scituate, Massachusetts, as bearing arms in 1643. The historian of that town, Samual Deane, relates that he was, while there resident, always engaged in the business of the town, and in drafting of deeds, bonds, etc., and is occasionally called a lawyer. He had lands adjoining Mosquasheut pond which he sold to the lawyer John Saffin in 1659, when he removed to Concord. His ability, vigor and originality of thought and action soon made him one of the prominent figures in Concord and vicinity, but he is found often at odds with the ecclesiastical oligarchy of the times. Whether like his sometime neighbor at Lancaster, John Prescott - to whose son he gave his oldest daughter - he sympathized with the Presbyterian criticisms of the theocratic restriction of political and religious privileges in the colony, is not known, but he strongly resembled Prescott in his persistency, enterprise and altruistic spirit. He was not only independent in speech, but rashly sharp of tongue and pen, and suffered accordingly at the hands of jealous authority. The story of his disbarment is best told by the original documents:-
In answer to the peticon or remonstrance of John Hoare, the Court finding that severall of the magistrates, and some others, are impeached for not doing justice and other complaints of a very high nature, doe therefore order that a hearing be granted to the peticoner, and that due notice be given to the complaynant to appeare to make good his severall charges, or otherwise to give reason for the same. Notice was given accordingly to the sayd Hoare, and the sayd John Hoare appearing in Court, his peticon or remonstrance being read wth such evidences as he produced, the Court proceeded as followeth:- Whereas John Hoare, of Concord, hath presented to this Court a petition or remonstrance, wherein he complains of great wrongs and injuryes he hath susteyned as his brother's agent, by reason he could not obteyne justice in some of our Courts of judicature in severall actions depending betweene himself, as agent and Lieut Richard Cooke, of Boston, the Court having affoorded him large liberty and oppertunity to make good his charges, and having heard all his allegations together wth such witnesses as were produced to proove the same and duely weighed the case, doe judge his complaints to be groundless and unjust, and his offences to be of a very high nature, tending not only to the dishonour of God, but to the scandall and reproach of severall of our Courts, honer'd magestrates, and officers of Court. That due witnes may be borne against such sinfull practises, and goverment of this jurisdiccon under his majestyes royall charter, may be upheld and mayntayned, this Court doeth order, that the sayd Hoare shall find suertyes bound in one hundred pounds for his good behavior during the Court's pleasure, and that henceforth he shall be disabled to plead any cases but his owne in this jurisdiction, and also that he pay as a fine the sume of fifty pounds for such his miscarriages, and be imprisoned till it be payd, or security given for the same. Whereas John Hoare, contrary to express order of the Court, hath withdrawn himself from the Court before his sentence was declared, the secretary is appointed by the Court to send for him, and require the performance of the sentence of this Court to all intents and purposes therein conteyned.
(Massachusetts Records, Vol. IV. Part II, p. 291-1665.)
In answer to the peticon of John Hoare, humbly desiring the favour of this Court to release him of his bonds of good behaviour and to make such abatement of his fine as their wisdomes shall judge meete. The Court judgeth it meete, and orders, the peticoner be released his bonds of good behaviour, and that twenty pounds of his fine be abated him.
(Massachusetts Records, Vol. IV. Part II, p. 301-1666.)
In ans'r to the petition of Alice, the wife of John Hoare, of Concord, the Court judgeth it meete, on the petitioner's satisfying and paying in to the Treasurer to his content the sume of tenn pounds to abate the remainder of her husband's fine yet remaining and unpaid.
(Massachusetts Records, Vol. IV. Part II, p. 387-1668.)
In 1668 John Hoare was charged before the county court of saying at the public house of Ensign William Buss "that the Blessing Master Bulkeley pronounced in dismissing the pubilque Assembly in the meeting-house was no better than vane babbling." Upon conviction of what the law of 1646 calls "the disparagement of the Lord's holy ordinance and making God's ways contemptible and ridiculous" he was fined ten pounds. He was also called upon to answer to the Court on two occasions "for neglecting the public worship of God on the Lord's day." (County Court Files, 1668-1675.)

He moved to Concord in 1659 where he was a prominent figure, but often found himself at odds with the ecclesiastical oligarchy of his times. He was disbarred in 1665 for sinful practices. In 1668 he was charged before the county court at the public house of Ensign William Buss "that the Blessing Master Bulkeley pronounced in dismissing the publique Assembly in the meeting-house was no better than vane babbling”. He was fined 10 pounds for conviction of what the law of 1646 called "the disparagement of the Lord's holy ordinance and making God's ways contemptible and ridiculous”. Also reported by Nourse that he was called upon twice "for neglaecting the public worship of God on the Lord's day.

One writer not identified by William Hoar indicates that "neither imprisonment, fines nor old age could put a curb on John Hoar's freedom of speech.”. [20]

In November 1675 when food and fuel failed the Christian Indians at Nashoba they were removed to Concord. No one in Concord would take them in until John Hoare consented to do so. He gave them shelter in his own home and offices and began the building of a workshop and a palisade where they could work by day and be kept safely by night. Following false allegations against the natives one Sunday Samuel Morsely appeared in a Concord meeting house declared he was he was going to remove the natives to Boston. Over John Hoar's objection and without authority he broke into Hoar's premises , robbed the Indians of most of their personal property and sent them to Deer Island under escort of some twenty solders.

While Colonial Governor was not happy with Moseley's actions they took no action to discipline him nor recompense John Hoare for his losses which were considerable.

On Feb. 10, 1676, one Mrs.Mary Rowlandson and child, both wounded, wife of the minister at Lancester, Mass., were taken prisoners at that place. Her story is told in one of the first American best sellers entitled The Narative of the captivity and Restoration of Mrs Mary Rowlandson which may be read online by clicking on the picture to the left

Efforts were made to secure her release, but without success, until Mr. Hoare by the desire of her husband made the attempt. Under date of April 28, 1676, he left Lancester with two guides, Nepphonet and Peter Tatatiquinea and met the hostile Indians at Wachusett Lake (now in Princeton, Mass.) He took £20 and some goods and secured her release, although King Philip refused his consent. They returned to Lancester and she went to Boston May 7th.

The granite ledge known as Redemption Rock is the site of the famous release from captivity of Mary White Rowlandson. On its perpendicular face is inscribed: "Upon this rock May 2nd 1676 was made the agreement for the ransom of Mrs. Mary Rowlandson of Lancaster between the Indians and John Hoar of Concord. King Philip was with the Indians but refused his consent. Mary White Rowlandson (1637-1711) told her own story in "The Narrative of the Captivity and Restoration of Mrs. Mary Rowlandson,” which first appeared in public in 1679, three years after her capture and release. It would become a 17th-century bestseller on both sides of the Atlantic with 15 editions published before 1800. According to Neal Salisbury, who re-published Mary's narrative in 1997 as "The Sovereignty and Goodness of God,” in 1653, Lancaster was a frontier town in the "wild, wild west” of Massachusetts. The Rock southeast of Wachusett Lake was a point of contact between two civilizations. Many of New England's Native American tribes, angered by the spread of colonial settlements, the conversion of forests into farmland, and perceived injustices at the hands of colonists, joined the Wampanoag sachem Metacom (called Philip by the English) in an attempt to drive the colonists from their new homelands, in the process destroying hunting grounds, winter camps, and settlements. Mary White Rowlandson's narrative begins on February 10, 1676, when 400 Nipmucs, Narragansetts, and Wampanoags attacked Lancaster "about sun-rising." Mary, her three children, and twenty other captives were taken into "the vast and desolate wilderness, I knew not whither" After many removes(shifts of locations), they ultimately rendezvoused with King Philip near the present day New Hampshire-Vermont border north of Northfield, MA. Her bible was a source of comfort throughout, and her sewing skills, quickly discovered, placed her in good favor; for a shilling, she was asked to make a shirt for King Philip. Mary and her captors returned by late April 1676. [21]

John Hoar of Concord, who had instructed and protected a group of "praying Indians," went to negotiate her release at the flat-topped outcrop overlooking a meadow where the Native Americans had camped. She writes,"Philip who was in the company came up and took me by the hand and said, "Two weeks more and you shall be Mistress again". Later, a ransom was raised"by some Boston gentlemen." She traveled to Boston with John Hoar to be reunited with her husband, son, and eldest daughter (the youngest had died from wounds eight days after the raid). This historic site was acquired in 1889 by Senator George F. Hoar, one of the founders and first president of The Trustees. It was donated to The Trustees in 1952 by the Senator's descendants, John Hoar and John Hoar, Jr.

UPON THIS ROCK MAY 2D 1676 WAS MADE THE AGREEMENT FOR THE RANSOM OF MRS. MARY ROWLANDSON OF LANCASTER BETWEEN THE INDIANS AND JOHN HOAR OF CONCORD. KING PHILIP WAS WITH THE INDIANS BUT REFUSED HIS CONSENT

Here negotiations for her ransom began toward the end of April. On May 2, 1676, Mary Rowlandson was exchanged at Redemption Rock[21]

To the Hono'rd Generall Court Now Assembled
In Boston May 24th, 1682. The Humble Petition of John Hoare - Humbly Sheweth that whereas in the yeare 1665 yo'r Poor Petitioner was comitted to Prison forced to find sure tyies for his good behavior and also fyned fivety pound for doing such things as I humbly conceived were but my duty and also prohibited from pleading any bodies cause but my owne; Now yo'r poor Petitioner hath a long time layne under the smart of these sufferings and hath often moved for a release but such hath bene the unhappyness of yo'r Poor Suppliant that he hath not yet obtained such a good day the want whereof hath bene greatly rejuditiall to my Brother Mr. Daniel Hoare his Estate and so my owne and also unto my name and famyly. The perticulars in my petition then exhibited to the Honor'd Generall Court wear such as my Brother Mr. Henery Flint of Brantrey & Mr. Edmond Browne of Sudbury did judge would not give any ofence. And in that hope I did present it.
I Humbly now present to this Hon'rd Court that in the time of the warr I tooke the charge of about sixty Indians belonging to Nashoby by the order of Majo'r Willerd, Majo'r Gookin, Mr. Elliot, and the select men of Concord. I built them a fort that cost mee of my own estate fourty pounds and went with my teame in Hazard of my life to save and bring home there Corne and also borrowed Rey and hors for them to plant and sow which I was forced to pay for myself. I also made several Journeys to Lancaster and to the Counsell and two Journies to the Indians to redeme Mrs. Rowlinson and Good wife Kettle with two horses and provisions and gave the sagamores considerably of my owne estate above whatever I received of the Countrey and by the favor of god obtained of them that they would fight noe more but in ther owne defence; Seth Perry also had several things of mee to give the Indians that hee might escape with his life. My sonn Daniel Hoare also was Indicted for his life yet by divine providence was spared, yet was sentence to pay five pounds to the Indians and five pounds to the Countery tho' as I humbly Conceive he had not broken any Law.
My Humble Supplication on all accounts to this Hon'rd Court is that I might be settatt Liberty from my sentence and may enjoy the liberty of an English man, and alsto that the Cor't would pleas to remitt my son Daniel's sentence. And if they please to grant me some small parcel of Land to comfort my wife with respect unto all her suffereings by my disbursements fro the Countrey as above recited. And yo'r Petitioner shall give thanks to the Lord and you And shall ever Pray - JOHN HOARE

He was released from his bonds and restraint from pleading in the courts. Furthermore, the magistrates recommended "that considering his publike service & Costs in securing the Nashoby Indians at his house in Concord by order of this Court's Committee for several months in time of said warr, and for his adventuring his life to goe up to the Indians in the time of the warr the successe whereof was the Redeeming of some Captives particulary Mrs. Rowlandson", some 200 acres of land would be granted his family. But the deputies in the General Court disagreed and answered:

"In ans'r to the Petition of John Hoare, and on further consideration thereof the Court judge meet for his service donne for the publick etc. to grant to the wife and children of the said John Hoare two hundred acres of land in any common lands from former grants, and not hindering a plantation." (Mass. Records, v. V, p. 359)

Samuel Sewall noted in his diary for 8 Nov. 1690, "Jn'o Hoar comes into the Lobby and saies he comes from the Lord, by the Lord, to speak for the Lord: Complains that Sins as bad as Sodom's found here."

John did not leave a will and his probate shows that his son Daniel had been taking care of John and Alice since 1683. (Middlesex Probate, #11589).

He married Alice Unknown(allegedly Alice Lisle, born about 1628, daughter of Sir John Lord Lisle, President of the High Court of Justice, Lord commissioner of the great seal, who drew the indictment and death sentence of King Charles1, He was murdered in Lusanne, Switzerland Aug. 11, 1664. Alice's mother Alice Beckonshaw Lisle was beheaded by brutal judgment of Jeffries in 1685. The Story of her arrest on a charge of treason for sheltering rebels her condemnation to be burned alive and her execution by beheading, with all the cruel, gastly, details, forms a disgraceful page in English History. There is no evidence to substantiate this connection.)

Their children include
Elizabeth b. before 1649 m. Jonathan Prescott in 1675
Mary b. before 1650 m. 1688 Benjamin Groves
Daniel b. 1650 (See below)

Daniel Hoar 1650 - 1743[22]

Daniel Hoar, son of John and Alice Hoar was born in 1650 at Scituate, Plymouth, Massachusetts. On 11 August 1676 Daniel and 3 other men were charged with killing 3 Aboriginal women and children. Two were executed in October; Daniel escaped with a fine of ₤10. He married Mary Stratton, daughter of Samuel and Mary (Frye) Stratton on 16 July 1677. They lived at Concord. Mary died 1717. Daniel then married Mary (Foxe) Lee, twice widowed, 16 Oct. 1717. Daniel died on 8 Feb. 1743.

Their children include

John Hoar
Daniel Hoar
Leonard Hoar
Jonathan Hoar
Joseph Hoar
Mary Hoar
Samuel Hoar
Benjamin Hoar
Isaac Hoar
David Hoar
Elizabeth Hoar
Mary Hoar

Nourse 1899:

Leonard Hoar 1682 - 1771[23]

Leonard Hoar, son of Daniel and Mary (Stratton) Hoar was born in 1682 at Concord, MA. He married Esther Hubbard, daughter of Daniel and Esther (Rice) Hubbard, 13 Nov. 1707. Leonard was captain and served in the Indian Wars.

They moved from Concord to Brimfield where he bought a 40 acre lot. He was a Representative to the General court 1729-1731. Trustee in 1731 Selectman for Brimfield at various times 1734 to 1753. Leonard died 1771 and is buried in the Northwest corner of the old Brimfield Cemetery.

Their children include

Joseph Hoar, b. 1708, m. Deborah Colton (1708-1800) d. 17977
Daniel Hoar, b. 1710, d. 1738
Sarah Hoar,
Leonard Hoar, b. 1711, m. 1736 Mary Morgan
David Hoar, b. 1713, (See below)
Charles Hoar, b. 1714 m. Elizabeth Cowles
Edmond Hoar, b. 1716
Esther Hoar, b. 1719, m. 1736 David Shumway
Mary Hoar m. Samuel Colton
Nathan Hoar m. 1751 Miriam Colton b. 1723

David Hoar 1713 - 1783[24]

David Hoar, son of Leonard and Easther (Esther) Hubbard was born at Brimfield, Massachusetts on 23 Feb. 1713. He married Abigail Hitchcock 27 May 1741 daughter of John and Abigail (Stebbins) Hitchcock.

Their Children include,
David Hoar b. 1743 died in infancy
Abigail Hoar b. 1744
Mary Hoar b. 1746 m. Alexander Mackenzie d. 1787
Solomon Hoar b. 1748 See below
Ebenezer Hoar b. 1751 m. 1775 Catherine Downey
David Hoar b. 1753
Ruth Hoar b. 1756
Prudence Hoar b. 1760 m. 1781 Joseph Weatherbee

On May 9th 1752 David Hoar Husbandman of Western (now Warren) MA bought one part of a certain Grist mill and Saw mill Scituate and one certain part of an adjoining Iron Works from Captain Ephraim Hayward which had been purchased by deed from Daniel Smith (called the old or Lower works or mill at the same time David Hoar conveyed to Ephraim Haywardfor 30 pounds a certain part of a grist mill Sawmill & iron Works called the old or Lower Works which Hoar and hayward had feom Gershom Makespeace. On Christmas Day Hoar bought Haywards half interest in agrist mill and refinery upon Quabaug River, north of Wigwam Brook Subsequent property transactions suggest that Hoar and Hayward ran into financial difficulties.

In 1759 David Hoar and Ephraim Hayward were among 121 Yeomen and one women, of Massachusetts Bay , New England subscribed a Petition requesting land in Cobequid, Nova Scotia under Daniel Knowlton. Their

Petition was presented to His Majesty Council in Halifax 26 October 1759 and on November 24th 1759 a preliminary grant of one Right (500 acres) in the Township of Truro for each of the 122 applicants was issued by Governor Charles Lawrence Eventually most of the grantees were assigned land in Onslow Township instead of Truro.

Miller indicates that 20 men came up the Bay of Fundy from New England to Truro and Onslow in the fall of 1759 to make preparation for a settlement. They returned to New England for the winter but returned the spring 1760. All the women returned to New England in the fall of 1760. They returned in the spring of 1761 with a number of others settlers. It is not known exactly when David Hoard first arrived in Nova Scotia but he had arrived at least by 1761 as indicated by the following Onslow Township Record:

"Att a meeting of the Proprietors of the Township of Onslow at sd. Onslow The 28th day of July, Anno-Dom. 1761, The Following Vots were passed-Capn Ephraim Hayward chosen moderator:
1. Granted unto Capn Ephraim Hayward, David Hoar, and Jeams Wilson, the Privilege of a Mill-place on a Stream Lying west of sd. Wilson's first Devision Lott Next Ajoying to the ed. Lott: Joyntly and Eaquilhy to have the above mentioned Mill Place with the pondage and privilidges Belonging Thereunto –for the above mentioned Hayward to Build a Grist-mill, And for said Wilson and hoar to Build a Saw Mill. Both said Mills to be built on One Dam against or near above sd. Wilson House. The above mentioned Privilidges Granted to the above sd Wilson and Hoar on Condition that they build a saw Mill in the Place before mentioned or Granted In Three months from the Date, and keep the same in Good Repair for the Terms of Seven years, on neglect or failure there said Last Grant is to be Forfeit and of none Effect."[25]

On 28 April 1762 was granted a commission as David Hore was granted a Gen Second Lieutenant of the regement of Miltia for the township for the Township of Onslow.

He was living at least by Aug 1 1791 when he conveyed property Colchester County Registry of Deeds). For certain consideration, Samuel Wheppe had bound himself and his heirs in 1783 to the maintenance of David and Abigail Hoar in their old age. Their was a charge against the Wheppe Estate until 24 July 1804 by which time both David and Abigail were deceased.

Solomon Hoar 1748 - 1828[26]

Solomon Hoar, son of David and Abigail Hitchcock was born 24 Sept. 1748 in Brimfield, MA, USA.

At the age of 12 years he arrived in Nova Scotia with his family in the spring of 1761. On October 3 1768 a government committee which met in Onslow listed Solomon among residence of the Onslow Township beneath his father (Morris / Binney Report). He was identified as aproprietor holding one Right or Share By Committee (NSARM RG! v.222 #36). He was allotted One Share, 500 acres of land on 25 February 1769. In the January 1 1771 Onslow Township Census he was listed as Sollomon Hore holding 500 acres of granted land 2 arable acres, 5 mowing acres and 493 wooded acres, owning 1 horse, 2 oxen/bulls (NSARM RG! v 443 #25)

He married Mary Lynds, daughter Jacob and Mary Lynds, on 1 Apr. 1773 at Onslow, Colchester County, N.S. Their children were

Jacob Hoar b. 2 March 1774 d. 19 Apr 1774
Esther Hoar b. 11 March 1775
Mary Margaret Hoar b. 27 April 1777
Lydia Hoar b. 13 April 1779
Abigail Hoar b. 3 Jun. 1781
David Hoar b. 28 Sept. 1783
Marian Hoar b. 1 Jan 1785
Ruth Hoar 19 Apr. 1787
Solomon Hoar 18 Apr. 1792

NSARM RG! v3611/2 pp 26,27,28,29,37,47,53, 63,69,75,93)

By the end of 1773 Arable acres had increased to 3 acres and mowing acres to 6 acres.

In the autumn of 1775 following the outbreak of the American Revolutionary War the Nova Scotia Governor Francis Legge became concerned about the defenceless state of the capital Halifax. The Government legislated the rising of a mobile force ready to meet the enemy threats in any part of the Province and to impose a tax to pay for it. The "out-settlements like those in Cobequid were to provide the bulk of this army part of which was to be posted to Halifax immediately. The Townships of Truro and Onslow almost unanimously opposition to the Government's plan by drafting a petition to the Governor and His Majesty's Council (See Onslow Petitioners of 1776 in Planters and Grantees of Cobequid Volume 2, Page 791). The Governor backed down deferring the tax and insisting on the posting only in the event of actual invasion.

On October 18 1779 Solomon Hoar along with other grantees of lands in the Township of Onslow applied for a partition of lands to determine their exact lots of land. This was eventually determined by a Jury on July 28 1783.

Solomon was enumerated to pay poll tax in Onslow Township i1791-1795) and filled public offices such as Assessor and Overseer of the Poor.

On July 26 1798 Elder Solomon Hoar was among 140 subscribers to the call to Reverent John Waddle to join the aging Rev Daniel Cock.

Solomon Hoar is reported by Miller to have died in 1828 predeceased by his wife Mary in 1815.

David Hoar 1783 - 1861[27]

[28]]

David Hoar, son of Solomon and Mary Hoar on 28 Sept. 1783. He married Rebecca Smith in Onslow, Colchester County, N.S. on 28 Dec. 1809. David died 1861.

Their children include,
Asa Hoar b. 26 Oct. 1810
Agnes Hoar 28 July 1812
Matilda Hoar 27 Jul. 1814
David Hoar 11 Jun. 1816
Archibald Hoar 11 Jun. 1818
Robert Smith Hoar b. 23 March 1820
John Lutes Hoar 6 July 1822
Olive Hoar 9 September 1824
William Hoar 6 July 1826
Solomon Hoar 8 Dec. 1828
Mary Hoar 30 Jan 1831
Rebecca Hoar 15 Mar 1833

Agnes Hoar 1812 - 1896. [29]Married Robert John Nelson

Agnes Hoar, daughter of David and Rebecca Hoar, was born on 28 Jul. 1812 in Onslow Township, Colchester County, Nova Scotia, Canada. She was known as Nancy. She married Robert John Nelson on 9 Jan 1831 in Onslow, Colchester County, Nova Scotia. She died in 1896 in East Mountain, Colchester County, Nova Scotia.[30]

[31] [32]

Their children include,

Samuel Scott Nelson b. 7 Feb. 1831
Mary Nelson b. 24 September 1832
David Nelson b. 16 November 1834
Robert Nelson Jr. b. 20 November 1836
John Nelson b. 17 February 1839
Rebecca Nelson b. 4 April 1841

Sources of Hoare Genealogy and History

[1]Hoar, William S. By Way of New England, Hoar and Newcomb Pioneers in America, Vancouver, Canada: Tangled Roots Press, 1996
[2]Nourse Henry S (1899) The Ancestry of the Hoar Family in America, A Compilation from Collections made by the Honorable George Frisbie Hoar. reprinted in New England Historical and Genealogy Register 53 92-101, 186-198, 289-300
[3]Hoar (1996) pg 75
[4]Nourse Henry S (1899) The Ancestry of the Hoar Family in America, A Compilation from Collections made by the Honorable George Frisbie Hoar. reprinted in New England Historical and Genealogy Register 53 92-101, 186-198, 289-300
Presbyterian Witness, Vital Statistics 1888-1908 Vol. 3 page 1183
[8] Gwen Lefton, Ancestral Lines P 58. Monograph located at Colchester Historical Society [8]zzzz
[9]Nourse Henry S (1899) The Ancestry of the Hoar Family in America, A Compilation from Collections made by the Honorable George Frisbie Hoar. reprinted in New England Historical and Genealogy Register 53 92-101, 186-198, 289-300
[10]Storey, Moorfield(1911) Ebenezer Rockwood Hoar: A Memoir
[11]Storey, Moorfield(1911) Ebenezer Rockwood Hoar: A Memoir
[18]Note on John Hoar's Birth
[19]Nourse's comments on How John Hoar got along with Ecclesiastic Authorities
[24]Campbell, Carol and James F. Smith (2011) Planters and Grantees of Cobequid, Nova Scotia, 1761-1780, Volume 1 Page 465
[25]CCRD, Colchester County Registry od Deeds , Now called Land Registration Office Truro NS.quoted from Planters and Grantees of Cobequid, Nova Scotia Volume 1 page 466
[28]xxxx
[29]zzzz

Freeman, Victoria, Distant Relations, How My Ancestors Colonized North America provides an excellent background on relations between whites and First Nations.

Additional, information may be found in Nourse 1899, The Hoar Family In America

In November, 1675, food and fuel failed the little community of Christian Indians at Nashoba, and a committee composed of Major Daniel Gookin, Major Simon Willard and Rev. John Eliot, the selectmen consenting, caused their removal to Concord. They numbered fifty-eight men, women and children, and no man in Concord could be prevailed upon to take charge of them until John Hoare consented to do so. He gave them quarters in his own house and offices, and began the building of a workshop and palisade wherein they could labor by day and be safely kept at night. The whole land was overshadowed by the horrors of Indian warfare, and in the frontier towns the howling of a wolf or the hooting of an owl, indistinctly heard, sent pallor to the cheeks and the chill of fear to the hearts of wives and mothers, lest it might be the war-whoop of Philip's savage crew, or the death shriek of an absent son, father or husband. In the midst of the public panic came the false rumor that some of Eliot's converts were among the blood-stained murderers. Mrs. Rowlandson has informed us that she was told by her captors, and she evidently believed, that the seven persons killed at Lancaster, August 22, 1675 "were slain and mangled in a barbarous manner by one-eyed John and Marlborough's praying Indians." Yet the red men so accused, seized and taken to Boston by Captain Moseley, upon their trial proved an undoubted alibi. It was not strange in a time of such excitement that many of the people of Concord were greatly troubled by the presence among them of Mr. Hoare's wards. Suddenly upon a Lord's day the most brutal of the Colony captains, Samuel Moseley, appeared in the Concord meeting-house with his rough troopers, probably by invitation of the dissatisfied, and after the service declared his intention to remove the Nashoba Indians to Boston. Receiving what he considered due encouragement, he without authority and in spite of the vigorous protests of John Hoare, broke into his premises and sent "the heathen" robbed of most of their personal property, down to Deer Island under a guard of twenty soldiers. The story is told at length in Major Daniel Gookin's History of the Christian Indians. (See Archæologia Americana, p. 495, et seq.) The colonial governor and council were not well pleased by Mosely's contemptuous assumption of their powers, but did not dare to bring him to bar for his atrocious offence, nor did they recompense the brave John Hoare for his losses, which Gookin acknowledges "were considerable," Soon followed the massacre of February 10, 1676, at Lancaster, and when the governor and council sought to ransom the captive women and children they could find no efficient help until the abused Nashoba Christians came to their aid, and bore their messages to the then haughty sagamores April 3 and 28. With them on the latter date went John Hoare at the solicitation of the minister, Joseph Rowlandson. The historian, Hubbard, mentions the heroism, but forgets the hero's name who risked more than life in putting himself into the power of the merciles: "A person formerly acquainted with the Indians about Lancaster, did adventure upon the forementioned overtures, to go amongst them to try if he could not prevail with them for the redemption of the minister's wife, . . . . and through the favour of him who having the hearts of all in his hand, inclines them as he pleases, obtained the desired end for an inconsiderable sum, which gave encouragement to the council to send two messengers on the like errand the same week, to procure the redemption of others, not without success." These two messengers were Seth Perry sent on May 3, and Jonathon Prescott, John Hoare's son-in-law, on May 5.
Mrs. Rowlandson in her Narrative gives us a more lively picture of the trials of the embassy to the sachems of Wachuset:
On the Sabbath-day [April 30], the sun being about an hour high, in the afternoon, came Mr. John Hoar, (the Council permitting him, and his own foreward spirit inclining him) together with the two forementioned Indians, Tom and Peter, with their third Letter from the Council. When they came near, I was abroad though I saw them not; they presently called me in and bade me sit down and not stir. They then catched up their Guns and away they ran as if an Enemy had been at hand, and the Guns went off apace. I manifested some great trouble, and they asked me what was the matter? I told them I thought they had killed the Englishman (for they had in the mean time told me that an Englishman was come). They said no; They shot over his Horse, and under and before his Horse, and they pushed him this way and that way, at their pleasure, shewing what they could do. Then they let him come to their Wigwams. I begged of them to let me see the Englishman but they would not: . . . . When they had talked their fill with him, they suffered me to go to him . . . . . I know asked them whether I should go home with Mr. Hoar? they answered no, one and another of them; and it being night, we lay down with that answer. In the morning, Mr. Hoar invited the Saggamores to Dinner; but when we went to get it ready, we found they had stolen the greatest part of the Provision Mr. Hoar had brought out of the bags in the night; and we may see the wonderfull power of God in that one passage, in that when there was such a great number of the Indians together, and so greedy, of a little good food, and no English there but Mr. Hoar and myself, that they did not knock us in the head and take what we had; there not only being some Provision, but also Trading-cloth a part of the twenty pounds agreed upon. . . . . . . At night I asked them again if I should go home? They all as one said no, except my Husband would come for me. When we were lain down, my Master went out of the Wigwam, and by-and-by sent in an Indian called James the Printer, who told Mr. Hoar, that my Master would let me go home tomorrow, if he would let him have one pint of Liquors . . . . . On Tuesday morning they call their General Court (as they call it) to consult and determine whether I should go home or no. And they all as one man did seemingly consent to it that I should go home except Philip who would not come among them . . . . . . About the Sun going down, Mr. Hoar and myself, and the two Indians, came to Lancaster and a solemn sight it was to me. There had I lived many comfortable years amongst my Relations and Neighbours; and now not one Christian to be seen, nor one house left standing. We went on to a Farm-house that was yet standing, where we lay all night, and a comfortable lodging we had, though nothing but straw to lye on. The Lord preserved us in safety that night, and raised us up again in the morning, and carried us along, that before noon we came to Concord.
Before the war with the Indians was at an end John Hoare suffered an even more severe trial in the misfortune of his only son, a young man of twenty-six years. August 11, 1676, the grand jury, upon complaint of certain Christian Indians, presented and indicted Daniel Goble, Stephen Goble, Nathaniel Wilder and Daniel Hoare all of Concord, "for that they not having the feare of God before their eyes & being Instigated by the Divil with other his Accomplises at or on the 7th of August last, at or neere to Hurtlebury hill, in the woods in the precincts of Concord or neere thereunto did murder & kill three Indian weomen & three Indian Children contrary to the peace of our Soveraigne Lord the King, his Crowne & dignitye the law of God & of this Jurisdiction." The jury in the cases of Wilder and Hoare found a speciall verdict: "If being present & seing the fact done & concenting, it be murder then we find him gilty according to Inditement, if not not gilty." Stephen Goble was executed September 21, and Daniel Goble, September 26, several Indians suffering on the gallows the same day, as is told in the Diary of Samuel Sewall, I. pp. 21 and 22. The youths misled by them were pardoned.
11th Oct. 1676. Upon the humble peticon of Daniel Hoare & Nathaniell Wilder, presented to this Court, acknouledging the justice of this Court, & begging pardon for their lives, the Court have granted their petition and accordingly doe remitt the sentence of death passed against them, and order, that they pay prison charges and tenn pounds apeece money, halfe towards the charge of witnesses, to be payd to the Tresurer of the Country, and the other halfe to Andrew Pittime & Swagon, ye Indians prosecuting against them: on payment whereof they are discharged. (Massachusetts Records, Vol. V. p. 117.)
In a petition to the General Court, dated June 3, 1680, John Hoare calls himself of Braintree, having taken up his residence there temporarily. He asks relief from his sentence, saying: "I am now grown old, not like long to continue in this world, and loath to leave such a remembrance upon my name or to my children." The Council voted to grant his request, but the Deputies refused consent.
To the Hono'rd Generall Court Now Assembled
In Boston May 24th. 1682.
The Humble Petition of John Hoare-
Humbly Sheweth that wheras in the yeare 1665 yo'r Poor Petitioner was comitted to Prison forced to find suretyes for his good behaviour and also fyned fivety pound for doing such things as I humbly conceived were but my duty and also prohibited from pleadding any bodies caus but my owne: Now yo'r poor Petitioner hath a long time layne under the smart of these sufferings and hath often moved for a release but such hath bene the unhappyness of yo'r Poor Suppliant that he hath not yet obtained such a good day the want whereof hath bene greatly prejuditiall to my Brother Mr. Daniel Hoare his Estate and so my owne and also unto my name and famyly. The perticulars in my petition then exhibited to the Honor'd Generall Court wear such as my Brother Mr Henery Flint of Brantrey & Mr Edmond Browne of Sudbury did judge would not give any ofence.
And in that hope I did present it.
I Humbly now present to this Hon'rd Court that in the time of the warr I tooke the charge of about sixty Indians belonging to Nashoby by the order of Majo'r Willerd, Majo'r Gookin, Mr. Eliott, and the select men of Concord. I built them a fort that cost mee of my own estate fourty pounds and went with my teame in Hazard of my life to save and bring home there Corne and also borrowed Rey and hors for them to plant and sow which I was forced to pay for myselfe. I also made severall Journeys to Lancaster and to the Councell and two Journies to the Indians to redeme Mrs. Rowlinson and Good wife Kettle with two horses and provisions and gave the sagamores considerably of my owne estate above whatever I received of the Countrey and by the favor of god obtained of them that they would fight noe more but in their owne defence: Seth Perry also had severall things of mee to give the Indians that hee might escape with his life.

My sonn Daniel Hoare also was Indicted for his life yet by divine providence was spared, yet was sentanced to pay five pounds to the Indians and five pound to the Countrey tho' as I humbly Conceive he had not broken any Law.

My Humble Supplication on all accounts to this Hon'rd Court is that I might be sett att Liberty from my sentence and may enjoy the liberty of an English man, and also that the Cor't would pleas to grant me some small parcell of Land to comfort my wife with respect unto all her sufferings by my disbursements for the Countrey as above recited.

And yo'r Petitioner shall give thanks to the Lord and you And shall ever Pray

JOHN HOARE

The magistrates consented to release John Hoare from his bonds and from the restraint laid upon him as to his pleading in the courts and also "that considering his publike service & costs in securing the Nashoby Indians at his house in Concord by order of this Court's Comittee for severall moneths in time of said warr, and for his adventuring his life to goe up to the Indians in the time of the warr the successe whereof was the Redeeming of some Captives particularly Mrs. Rowlandson" two hundred acres of land should be granted his family. The deputies refused to concur and the following is the final answer of the Court:
In ans'r to the peticon of John Hoare, and on further consideration thereof the Court judge meet for his service donne for the publick etc. to grant to the wife and children of the said John Hoare two hundred acres of land in any comon lands from former grants, and not hindering a plantation. (Massachusetts Records, Vol. V. 359.)

John Hoare owned about three hundred acres in the western part of Concord, but exchanged the larger portion of this with Edward Wright, in 1672, for an estate in the East Quarter and for "all the right, title and interest which Edward Wright of Concord aforesaid, husbandman, hath or should have in and to certain houses, lands and hereditaments etc. in the Lordship of Castle Browmick (?) in the County of Warwick in the Kingdom of England." (See Middlesex Deeds, IV. 409). He died April 2, 1704, and his wife Alice _______ died June 5, 1696. Samuel Sewall makes in his Diary but one noteworthy mention of Mr. Hoare. Under date of Friday, Nov. 8, 1690, he writes, "Jn'o Hoar comes into the Lobby and sais he comes from the Lord, by the Lord, to speak for the Lord: Complains that Sins as bad as Sodom's found here." We may therefore infer that neither imprisonment nor fines nor old age could put a curb upon John Hoare's freedom of speech.

Abbreviations

NSARM - Nova Scotia Archives and Records Management, Halifax Nova Scotia

References

Nourse Henry S (1899) The Ancestry of the Hoar Family in America, A Compilation from Collections made by the Honorable George Frisbie Hoar. reprinted in New England Historical and Genealogy Register 53 92-101, 186-198, 289-300

Storey M and Emerson E.R. (1911) Ebernezer Rockwood Hoar A Memoir Houghton Mifflin Cambridge Mass